X t1 frontleft[Updated: added a third review from Chuq Von Rospach.]

A lot of photographers I trust have bought the Fujifilm X-T1 mirrorless camera, and I must admit I’m looking at it for my next body. My trusty Nikon D90 has served me well (and I hope will continue to serve me well), but it’s starting to age. I’d love to take advantage of the sensor technology updates that have occurred in the past five years.

Three personal reviews have caught my eye of late that I thought were worth sharing:

First, Zack Arias has been shooting primarily with the Fuji X-T1 for months and writes an official review at his site, DEDPXL.

Second, Mason Marsh explains Why I Bought a Fujifilm X-T1, which is also a meditation on choosing photography subject matter and stretching beyond personal boundaries.

Third, Chuq Von Rospach looks at the X-T1 from a landscape photography point of view, with plenty of beautiful examples and this great quote (about the Fuji X-Pro1): “The thing was, the images wouldn’t shut up. Both of these images are up on my wall and are two of my favorite Yosemite images ever, and that’s saying something. The more I looked at the results of the Fuji sensor, the more I liked it.”

(If you’re also thinking about the X-T1, please consider clicking the affiliate link at the top of this post, which helps support me and the work I do.)

Apple’s latest commercial is quick and fun, showing off a variety of lid stickers adorning the MacBook Air.

What caught my eye, aside from the glimpse of the old six-color Apple logo at the end, was the fact that each sticker is clearly on a different, real machine. It would have been easy for Apple to position one blank MacBook Air in front of the camera and then digitally add the stickers. But no: each sticker is affixed to a different MacBook Air. You can tell by watching the bottom edge, which shifts slightly, and also by the scratches and dings that appear on some models.

Stickers devil

(Looks like Matthew Panzarino had the same idea, posting this a few minutes before I posted my entry; we even chose the same sticker as example.)

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Lush, Newhalem Creek

A short hike from Newhalem Campground in the North Cascades mountains, Newhalem Creek has been a frequent photo stop for me over the years. The creek originates just around the bend here, but this year the water was so high that I couldn’t explore as far up as I usually do.

The water volume, plus a steady drizzle of rain, made for an especially lush photo opportunity.

(As usual, click the photo to view it bigger and better.)

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Simplicity is difficult, as any developer (or writer) will tell you. My latest column for the Seattle Times looks at two app examples that demonstrate how complex tools can be simply (and well) executed.

OmniFocus 2 for the Mac will appeal to people who need more power than just a simple to-do list, while Overcast for iOS is a podcast player that respects both podcast listeners and podcast creators.

Read the column here: Apps offer useful complexity with simple interface.

iPad field3 bikes

The third and last article in my iPad Photography in the Field series at Lynda.com is now up! It’s an extra long entry that covers how to use the iPad to sort your good photos from the not-so-good ones. It also explains how to apply essential metadata like keywords and IPTC information to your photos so you don’t need to do it later when you’re back at the computer, saving a ton of time.

Read the article here: iPad Photography in the Field: Rate, Tag, and Export Photos.

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Sparks Sunrise and Photographer

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.

Want to check out the latest edition of The iPad for Photographers? Peachpit has posted Chapter 4, “The iPad in the Studio,” online and as a downloadable PDF. The PDF is a great way to get a feel for the full print or PDF edition of the book. (I absolutely love the design of this book, with lots of big color photos and screenshots.)

Click here to download Chapter 4 as a PDF, or read the chapter online.

Also, a reminder: The book is currently Peachpit’s Ebook of the Week. Until July 19, you can get the ebook (which includes PDF, EPUB, and Mobi/Kindle files) for just $9.99!

Chapter 4: The iPad in the Studio

iPad for Photographers Third EditionThis Tuesday, July 15, join me online for a free Peachpit Photo Club Web presentation about The iPad for Photographers. The video event kicks off at 5 p.m. PST (8 p.m. EST), when I’ll be talking about options for using the iPad in the field, and working with Lightroom mobile, Photosmith, and other apps. Although the video should be available later, I encourage you to watch it live if possible so you can ask questions

Coinciding with the presentation, Peachpit has named the new, iPad for Photographers Third Edition its Ebook of the Week, pricing it at just $9.99 (50% off)! That includes PDF, EPUB, and Mobi (Kindle) formats—perfect to have as a reference on your iPad during photo excursions.

Not sure if the book is for you (or for someone who’d enjoy it as a gift)? Peachpit also put up a free chapter to sample.

The second article in my series at Lynda.com about using an iPad in the field for photography is now posted. (You can read the Part 1 here.) This one takes us out into the field itself, where I discuss the advantages and the how-to of reviewing photos on location. I talk about using the Apple camera adapters and also wireless options like the Eyefi, which lets you review shots on the iPad while you’re shooting. I also offer ideas for recording location information and getting on-the-spot model releases easily.

Here it is: iPad Photography in the Field: Review Photos on Location

iPad literally in a field

Macworld has just published my latest article, “Life after Aperture and iPhoto: What to do with your image library.” While my TidBITS article last week was about looking to the future of the upcoming Photos for OS X application, this one offers solid advice on just how to prepare for a move to another program.

Aperture relocate menu