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My latest article for Lynda.com is now posted, wherein I rebel against good photo settings and make the point that even mistakes are better than nothing. Go see the errors I made and how I compensated for them:

Epic Photography Fails…Can Be Awesome

(The headline is a little hyperbolic, but hey, it gets your attention, right?)

I also reference the movie The Paper, which also hinges around catchy headlines, and which is a great film about the newspaper profession. Go rent it—unfortunately, it’s not on any streaming service right now. (The photo above is a still from the movie.)

After you’ve read my article, be sure to check out the comments on the post at Facebook, where someone pasted a great photo of Rambo rapid-firing a DSLR at a butterfly.

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.

Sunflowers

As a writer, I’m always trying to avoid clichés, so naturally that applies to my photography, too. That thought was on my mind when I visited the Ballard Sunday Market near my home in Seattle. It had been too long since I’d wandered down to the market, and so my wife and I dragged our non-caffeinated selves out of the house and into the sunny morning.

(Click any photo to view it larger.)

After grabbing breakfast crèpes at one stand and much needed coffees from the Convoy Coffee cart, my brain was in a better place to start making photos. And that’s when my inner editor spoke up: “An open market? Could I get any more urban cliché than that?”

That voice is a real pain in the ass. Yes, a market can be a visual cliché. But a Sunday market is also filled with color, and variety, and interesting morning light. Those are all things that are great to put in front of a camera lens.

Baskets of Garlic Succulents

I also reminded myself that I wasn’t on assignment, or even shooting photos for any specific project. I deliberately chose to spend a lazy summer morning at the market, sampling food, talking with the woman I love, and experiencing life. I gave myself permission to take photos that appealed to me, and if none of them turned out well, that was okay.

Peppers and Tomatoes

I ended up leaving the market with a bouquet of sunflowers, a bottle of hard cider, half a dozen freshly made mini donuts, and a few photos I like.

Peppers, Ballard Sunday Market

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Are you confused about the differences between iCloud Photo Library, iCloud Photo Sharing, and My Photostream? (You’re not the only one.) Peachpit has published a sample chapter of my book Photos for OS X and iOS on their site, and chose “iCloud Photo Library” as the chapter to share.

View the chapter on the Web here: Introduction to iCloud Photo Library

Or, download it as a PDF, which includes the table of contents, introduction, and index, and gives you a sense of the book’s easy-to-follow design and full-color layout.

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.

Congratulations to Fuad K., Johnny S., and Agnes O., who each received a code to download the ebook!

pse13cib_150pxWhen I recently gave away five free ebook copies of my Photos for OS X and iOS book, I discovered some codes I’d overlooked for Photoshop Elements 13: Classroom in a Book. I can’t just let them go unclaimed!

So on Friday, August 21, I’m going to pick three random subscribers to my mailing list to receive the codes.

If you’re not already subscribed, go sign up now.

[Updated: I just realized have only three codes, not five. I apologize for the typo.]

I don’t post about many back-to-school sales because there are so many (as a technology journalist, my email is full of them), but this one’s special. Take Control Books is currently having its annual 50%-off sale on all ebooks, including mine!

Yes, this post is partly self-serving, but when you look at the breadth of the full Take Control catalog, you’ll see that it’s more than just a way to sell more copies of my Apple Watch Crash Course and Take Control of Your Digital Photos book. And did you see that all of it is 50% off?

You get some of the best technology writing available at half price, and the sales support great writers like Joe Kissell, Scholle McFarland, Jason Snell, Sharon Zardetto, Kirk McElhearn, Glenn Fleishman, and Michael Cohen.

The sale ends August 24, 2015, so jump on it now and spread the word!

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At Macworld, Glenn Fleishman reviews PowerPhotos 1.0, a companion utility for Photos for OS X that can find duplicates, easily manage multiple Photos libraries, and help migrate iPhoto and Aperture libraries to Photos for OS X.

The software does not merge Photos libraries; if you specifically want that feature, pick up iPhoto Library Manager by the same developer, Fat Cat Software. (According to the company’s blog, “This is something I’d like to add to PowerPhotos, though I can’t make any concrete promises, since doing so partially depends on whether Photos itself adds a few necessary enhancements.”)

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This week I was a guest of Gene Steinberg’s at The Tech Night Owl radio show, where we talked about my new book Photos for OS X and iOS, Apple’s Photos app and its photography ecosystem, the Apple Watch and my Apple Watch: a Take Control Crash Course book, as well as the timely topic of Google turning itself into Alphabet.

Listen to the episode here (MP3): The Tech Night Owl Live – August 15, 2015

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.

My column in today’s Seattle Times was inspired by two separate reports of readers who found themselves locked out of Safari due to scummy adware. I talk about how to get back into Safari and offer advice on how to avoid the scams in the future.

Read it here: Dealing with Safari adware that won’t go away

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.

I’ve added several landscape and cityscape photos to the Purchase Prints page of JeffCarlson.com. They’d look great on a wall in a house, conference room, or office. I make the prints through Bay Photo, which offers several high-quality materials and framing options, such as ThinWraps, MetalPrints, and canvas.

View the gallery here, and contact me about photos that interest you—including others that may not appear on that page; I’ve had people request photos they’ve seen on my galleries at Flickr, 500px, and Instagram.

 

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If you subscribe to Adobe’s Creative Cloud Photography Plan (which includes Lightroom CC and Photoshop CC, plus Creative Cloud syncing and Lightroom mobile for $10 a month), you probably received an email today containing a familiar name: me!

One of the highlights is a pointer (shown above) to the article that I published in Adobe Inspire in June, “Take Lightroom on Your Next Shoot.” If you missed the article when I pointed to it then, it’s all about how I used Lightroom mobile during a photo workshop in May through the California Redwoods.

I love writing articles like this, which point to practical things you can do with your photos in addition to inspiring you to get out and make more images. It was a fun one to write.

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.