Archives For water

Wispy Shilshole Sunset

While shooting the sunset the other night, I tried out the fairly-new HDR capture mode in Lightroom mobile on my iPhone 7. Consider me impressed! The app snaps three photos and merges them together right there, creating a DNG (Adobe’s “digital negative” format) with lots of image information for editing. I’m generally wary of in-camera HDR processing, because with most cameras you end up with just a JPEG that doesn’t give you as much editing capability later.

The initial shot looked great, and I tweaked it slightly, also in Lightroom mobile on my iPhone. In fact, the only time the image went beyond the phone was when I checked it using the large screen of my MacBook Pro; since I saved the capture to a synced collection, the photo was waiting for me in Lightroom. Be sure to click the photo to view it larger at Flickr.

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Shilshole Evening

After many days of rain, this weekend the sun reappeared and presented an opportunity for me to shoot a sunset. I also had some camera testing to do (more on that later), so I grabbed a coffee and headed down to Shilshole Marina for some sailboats and sky photography. The temperature dropped quickly once the sun dipped, turning my flat white to an iced coffee, but it turned out to be a nice evening out. This is an HDR made in Lightroom from three brackets. (Click the photo to view it larger at Flickr.)

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Jeff carlson berryessa v02

A decade ago, I captured the photo above at the Lake Berryessa Spillway, also known as the “Glory Hole.” The spillway is designed to direct overflow water beyond Monticello Dam, and unlike most, this one is a giant funnel that creates a hole in the lake. Seeing it in person is quite interesting, like you’re viewing a special effect in a movie.

When I took this shot, the sun was out, the sky was blue, and the spillway’s opening reflected the surrounding rocks. A print of this photo hung at the Art Wolfe Gallery in 2006 as a winning image in the Environmental Photography Invitational, and it was published in a magazine that featured works from that show. (I also met Art Wolfe, who was gracious and encouraging, even in the few minutes that we shook hands; Nathan Myhrvold, former Microsoftian and now gastropreneur, also had a photo selected for the exhibition.) At one point the image was also licensed for a visitor center display, I think at the Dufer Point Visitor Center, although I’d need to dig up some old records to be sure. I’m embarrassed to say I’ve never made it out there to see it! It may no longer be there.

In the intervening 10 years, California suffered through a horrible drought, which dropped the lake levels far below the spillway opening—in fact, far below the rock on which the opening is mounted! Take a look at this photo from September 2015 (courtesy of Flickr user torroid via Creative Commons license):

Now, following an extremely wet winter, Lake Berryessa has recovered its volume and then some (photo by Flickr user Doug Letterman via Creative Commons license).

Morning glory spillway

According to this article in The New York Times, the lake holds about 521 billion gallons of water before it begins pouring down the spillway. Be sure to watch the drone video to see it from multiple angles.

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Swimming in Green

My daughter spent a few weeks at “Grandma Camp,” staying with my mom and step-dad in northern California where the temperatures bounced between the high 80s and low 100s. They have a small swimming pool on their farm, which was a daily respite from the heat—and a lot of fun for my little fish.

At one point when she was playing with this inflatable raft, she had it wrapped around her like a shawl, with the sun illuminating it from behind. After a little cajoling, she agreed to let me take a photo of her in the same position. This was on our last day of the visit; we flew back to Seattle that evening, where it was (gloriously, in my opinion) gray and wet.

Goodbye summer. Hello autumn!

Camera: Fujifilm X-T1

Lens: Fujinon XF 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR

Shutter: 1/1000

Aperture: f/4.3

Focal length: 29mm

Edited in Lightroom CC

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Ramona Falls Moss

Moss grows on the rocks at the base of Ramona Falls in Oregon.

When it’s 100 degrees outside and you’re visiting friends in Portland, what’s the thing to do? Head for the hills and hike seven miles roundtrip to visit a beautiful, cool waterfall! The trail to get there wasn’t necessarily cool, but the destination was worth it.

Now, to remind my body that it’s okay to do physical exertion and that every muscle doesn’t need to be so sore the following day…

Ramona Falls

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Rainbow Leaf

The back of this leaf was like a rainbow—those are the genuine colors. Shot with an iPhone 5s and minimally processed in Instagram. View it large to get the full effect, especially the lovely vein details.

I love autumn.

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Middle Falls, BW

September and October are turning out to be extremely busy for me, work wise, so as a quick distraction/mental escape here’s another photo of Middle Falls near McCloud, California. (Here’s an earlier shot I posted.) The falls are easily accessible after a short hike, and I imagine the autumn colors are starting to look really good there now.

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Upper Newhalem Creek

(Click here to view the image larger)

To reach this area of Newhalem Creek, you first follow the Rock Shelter trail, which ends in a section of mountain adorned with petroglyphs where Native Americans would take shelter from the elements. But don’t turn toward the shelter and its accessible trail. Instead, turn left at the guidepost that points to Newhalem Creek and follow a smaller, less-maintained path through the forest.

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Middle Falls, McCloud River

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Lush, Newhalem Creek

A short hike from Newhalem Campground in the North Cascades mountains, Newhalem Creek has been a frequent photo stop for me over the years. The creek originates just around the bend here, but this year the water was so high that I couldn’t explore as far up as I usually do.

The water volume, plus a steady drizzle of rain, made for an especially lush photo opportunity.

(As usual, click the photo to view it bigger and better.)

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