Archives For Seattle times

My barber said, “I have too many clouds,” and I immediately sympathized. iCloud, Dropbox, OneDrive, Google Drive…I have files stashed in all of them. What surprised me when I set about to write this week’s column for the Seattle Times, is that I’ve so effortlessly moved so much of my work and personal data to cloud-based services.

iOS 10 and macOS Sierra, released last month, further entwine iCloud’s tendrils into everyday activities. In the column, I talk about how it enables me to control Philips Hue lights in my home from any remote location, unlock a Mac using my Apple Watch just by getting near it, and more.

Read the column here: Forecast: Increasing use of cloud services for just about everything.

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My latest column for The Seattle Times looks at what’s just around the corner: a few notable features in the macOS Sierra and iOS 10 betas. I’ve been running both (as well as watchOS 3), and am impressed so far. The features I mention in the column are just a sampling, and I focused on how the Mac and iPhone/iPad work together.

I didn’t have space to mention things like the Maps app automatically noting where you parked your car, how convenient the raise-to-wake feature on the iPhone is, or the convenience of replying to texts without leaving the current app (something possible under iOS 9, but expanded in iOS 10).

Read it here: Beta testing: In next macOS, everyday features work more closely across devices.

Also worth noting: Make sure you update to iOS 9.3.5, a quick-fix security update that Apple issued late last week to patch a hole that could enable an attacker to remotely control your device. TidBITS has more info here: iOS 9.3.5 Blocks Remote Jailbreak.

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.

My column in today’s Seattle Times was inspired by two separate reports of readers who found themselves locked out of Safari due to scummy adware. I talk about how to get back into Safari and offer advice on how to avoid the scams in the future.

Read it here: Dealing with Safari adware that won’t go away

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.

Does your MacBook or MacBook Pro spend most of its time plugged into a power outlet? If so, you’re not exercising the laptop’s battery enough and are reducing its lifespan. That’s even more important now that MacBook models built since 2009 include built-in batteries that are not swappable. In my latest Seattle Times column, I look at FruitJuice, a $9.99 utility that tells you how much time you should spend working from battery each day in order to get the best long-term performance.

Read it here: FruitJuice app keeps MacBook batteries in shape.

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume mailing list that I use to announce new projects and items that I think my readers would be interested in. (It’s hosted by MailChimp, so if you decide I’ve gotten too chatty in the future, you can unsubscribe easily.)

I’m still on a fantastic photography workshop (led by Mason Marsh), so I took the opportunity to write about the collision of technology and humanity among the participants.

Nature plus technology can focus on improving our lives

My MacBook Air battery observation the other night was in service of writing my latest Seattle Times column: New MacBook Air’s battery puts in a full day of work. I look at the new MacBook Air, which is a curious model of computer for Apple because it’s simultaneously a pro machine and also the company’s entry-level laptop.

I like the MacBook Air a lot, although the amazing battery improvement puts buyers of other Mac laptops in a bind: purchase now, or wait until the new Haswell processors are in each model?

My latest Practical Mac column for the Seattle Times looks at Adobe’s Creative Cloud, the subscription service for getting all of the Creative Suite applications (or, in my case, just InDesign) for a low monthly price: Creative Cloud bound to be popular with freelancers, students