Archives For landscape

Valley of Light

My wife and I spent the weekend near Leavenworth, Washington at a cozy cabin with this as the view. Although I didn’t know if there would be much of a sunset the first night, the sun shone horizontally down a nearby valley for a wonderful show. Having a glass of wine at hand didn’t hurt, either. (Click to view the image larger.)

About the photo: I merged three exposures using Lightroom’s built-in HDR tool and then edited it further in Lightroom.

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Middle Falls, BW

September and October are turning out to be extremely busy for me, work wise, so as a quick distraction/mental escape here’s another photo of Middle Falls near McCloud, California. (Here’s an earlier shot I posted.) The falls are easily accessible after a short hike, and I imagine the autumn colors are starting to look really good there now.

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Upper Newhalem Creek

(Click here to view the image larger)

To reach this area of Newhalem Creek, you first follow the Rock Shelter trail, which ends in a section of mountain adorned with petroglyphs where Native Americans would take shelter from the elements. But don’t turn toward the shelter and its accessible trail. Instead, turn left at the guidepost that points to Newhalem Creek and follow a smaller, less-maintained path through the forest.

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Tulip Sunrise #2

I know, it’s another photo from last week’s sunrise photo shoot at the tulip fields. But I can’t help sharing the beautiful light we encountered that morning (especially since it’s a very gray and rainy day in Seattle today). Enjoy!

[Interested in purchasing a print? Go to Zenfolio or 500px.]

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Tulip Sunrise

(Click the photo to view it larger)

Waking up at 4am to drive an hour north isn’t my definition of a good way to start a Saturday morning. This weekend, however, my family and I (yes, my daughter, too) headed at dark to Mount Vernon, Washington to photograph the tulip fields at sunrise. The weather cooperated nicely, with enough clouds in the sky for texture but also letting through the brilliant bright sun as it crested over the Cascade mountains.

After about an hour, the sun lifted into a thicker, higher cloud bank, which was the signal to go get breakfast (at Calico Cupboard in La Connor).

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Sparks Lake Cool Sunset

This photo comes from Sparks Lake in Oregon. I promise, I didn’t add any purple tone to this. (If you don’t believe me, take a look at Mason’s photo.) It was a beautiful sunset, and great to be out in it, despite the cold.

As always, this looks better bigger.

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Risk Appetite

January 28, 2014 — Leave a comment

I love this post by my friend Mason Marsh, “Risk Appetite.” Photographers take all sorts of risks when shooting, and sometimes it ends up with broken camera bodies and human bodies. What’s your risk appetite? Yes, I want to capture great photos, but I also like being in one piece. He writes:

I feel for these photographers who have lost their expensive cameras and lenses at Cape Kiwanda, but I also want to express my grumpy disdain for their choices. When you plant your tripod on bare rock on the Oregon Coast, you need to ask why it’s bare. The coast receives up to ten feet of rain each year, so if there’s any chance for green things to grow they will. When rock is bare near the ocean it’s usually because waves keep it that way. If intertidal life is living on the rock, that is a solid clue that the ground you are on will indeed get wet. If you are standing on grass and fluffy dunes, you are probably going to stay un-doused. Make choices with knowledge, not hubris. Anyone taking photographs in nature should take some time to get to know why things are the way they are. Our responsibility to ourselves as outdoor photographers is to manage our risks and enjoy our rewards. When things go sour and cameras die, that sucks but it’s the price we pay. It’s our risk tax.

South Falls Bridge

I want to return to Silver Falls State Park near Silverton, Oregon, because I feel like I only scratched the surface of the area when I visited in October. This photo was shot crouched at the edge of the creek near a bridge at the South Falls.

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Smith Rocks Sunrise

When I wrapped up the Oregon Wonders Photo Workshop in October, I had to quickly jump back into several ongoing projects, including updating my books about OS X Mavericks and the newest iPads. I took solace in the fact that winter would give me an opportunity to go through the shots.

This week has been cold and rainy in Seattle, perfect conditions for traversing my Lightroom library and working on photos from that great trip. I don’t have the luxury of being able to devote all my time to editing photos—oh, if only I did—but I am making sure I don’t ignore them entirely.

This photo comes from a fun sunrise photo shoot at Smith Rocks near Terrebonne, Oregon. I was afraid that a week of early pre-dawn mornings would be a disaster for me, a notorious night owl, but anticipating lovely morning light like this is enough to get me moving. (And coffee. Dear heavens, you can’t forget the coffee.) The sun comes up behind where I was standing, frosting the tops of the rocks at first and then pushing the shadows down.

Here are a couple more photos from that morning. Also take a look at images by my fellow workshoppers David, June, Jack, Garrett, Mason, Kathy, and Dianne.

The river and its reflection made for a nice vertical composition:

Smith Rock Sunrise

Here are the rocks at left, shot from a different location:

Smith Rock Sunrise 2

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Cedar Creek Grist Mill

Lots of rain couldn’t dampen my photo excitement while shooting the Cedar Creek Grist Mill in October. The autumn colors were just a little past prime, but everything else was visually wonderful. This is shot from a covered bridge nearby.

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