Archives For lightroom

Wispy Shilshole Sunset

While shooting the sunset the other night, I tried out the fairly-new HDR capture mode in Lightroom mobile on my iPhone 7. Consider me impressed! The app snaps three photos and merges them together right there, creating a DNG (Adobe’s “digital negative” format) with lots of image information for editing. I’m generally wary of in-camera HDR processing, because with most cameras you end up with just a JPEG that doesn’t give you as much editing capability later.

The initial shot looked great, and I tweaked it slightly, also in Lightroom mobile on my iPhone. In fact, the only time the image went beyond the phone was when I checked it using the large screen of my MacBook Pro; since I saved the capture to a synced collection, the photo was waiting for me in Lightroom. Be sure to click the photo to view it larger at Flickr.

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.

10 Years of Lightroom

February 19, 2017 — Leave a comment

Lightroom 10 years

Ten years, man! Ten! Years!

Thanks to Victoria “The Lightroom Queen” Brampton’s newsletter, I learned that my photo organizer and editor of choice turned 10 this weekend. Unlike Victoria, I joined the Lightroom party late after starting off with Aperture, but it’s been the heart of my photo library for probably eight of those ten years. In a new blog post, Victoria runs down the history of Lightroom from the beginning, from the early betas to the latest mobile incarnations. It’s a good read if you’ve been using Lightroom for a while.

Speaking of Lightroom, the application features heavily into my own book, Take Control of Your Digital Photos on a Mac. I’m almost done updating the manuscript for a new revision. Look for that soon!

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.

Birdhouses

Over at TidBITS, I write in more depth about the changes in Lightroom for iOS 2.4, and they’re doozies: Lightroom for iOS 2.4 Changes Mobile Photo Workflow.

As I mentioned a couple of weeks ago, adding native raw file format support to Adobe’s mobile photo editor is a big deal, especially for people who are looking to use just an iPad or iPhone on photo shoots to minimize the gear they carry.

It means you don’t end up with separate edited copies of photos that are synced with Lightroom on the desktop—a raw file editing in Lightroom mobile is synced to your main library with edits intact. And the editing power takes a big leap in quality, pulling detail out of shadows without blocking up sections where JPEGs just don’t hold up.

For example, here’s an underexposed raw photo edited entirely in Lightroom on my iPad:

LRm24 raw before after

There’s a better example in the article that shows extreme pixelation in a JPEG.

I also talk about the new local selection tools, which are great for adjusting selected portions in linear or gradient areas. Here’s another before-and-after, showing the radial tools at work; I was able to bring up the exposure for just the birdhouses without overexposing the background.

Lightroom m24 local original

Lightroom m24 local radial

Overall, this is an exciting release, something I’ve been looking forward to for years. It streamlines the mobile photo workflow and does what I envisioned in 2011 when I wrote the first edition of my iPad for Photographers book.

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.

Lightroom for iOS 2.4

Adobe just released a significant update for the iOS version of Lightroom, bringing two features mobile photographers are going to love: raw import and editing, and linear and radial graduated adjustments. The first could change how we work with photos in the field, and the second is a feature I use more and more on the desktop and have in the past resorted to interesting workarounds to implement on the iPad.

I need to dig more into this release, but it looks promising. Photos you import using Apple’s Lightning adapters are brought into the Photos app Camera Roll, and then recognized by Lightroom as raw. (Oh, but now I lament Apple’s choice of sticking with USB 2.0 speed for photo import on the 9.7-inch iPad Pro.) This could mean no longer needing to shoot in Raw+JPEG just to get a high-resolution JPEG to work with on the device.

(Remember, until now Lightroom wouldn’t even display raw images when importing them from the Camera Roll, and in most apps, the JPEG preview the camera creates to display on its LCD is what’s used for editing.)

Adobe says the app supports all the same raw formats that Lightroom on the desktop supports; I had no trouble opening and editing a handful of raw .RAF files from my Fuji X-T1.

Lightroom ios 2 4 raw badges

I’ll be writing more about this, looking at how Lightroom syncs the raw files back to the desktop, whether it’s practical to import a lot of images or just selected ones, and what this means for Apple’s upcoming raw image support in iOS 10.

For now, here’s more information from Adobe: Lightroom for Mobile July Releases.

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.

Tco dp2 ipad head1

I’m happy to announce that the big second edition of my ebook Take Control of Your Digital Photos on a Mac is now available!

The first edition came out two years ago, and in that time a lot has changed for Mac-owning photographers. The biggest shift for many people was Apple discontinuing iPhoto and Aperture, and replacing them with a single new application, Photos for OS X (which I’ve written extensively about, including my print book for Peachpit Press). As a result, I had to gut and rewrite sections of the first edition to include Photos and some of its quirks (such as not using star ratings).

The other notable change has been the massive ongoing shift to mobile photography. With great cameras in the iPhone and iPad, and iOS software and hardware to back them up, we now take more photos than ever. As a result, many services have cropped up that offer cloud storage and retrieval of your photos from any device. This second edition of the book includes an entirely new chapter that looks at services such as iCloud Photo Library, Google Photos, Lightroom mobile, and Mylio, and how they can integrate with your photo workflow.

If you already own the first edition, thank you! Click the Ebook Extras link on the cover to go to the Take Control store and upgrade for $5 off.

If you’re new to the book and looking to tame your photo workflow, go buy the second edition at the Take Control Bookstore.

Oh dear, did I say “workflow”? Hard to believe, but that doesn’t have to be an intimidating word—that’s the entire reason I wrote the book! I wanted to share a way to take control of the large number of photos we capture without it being a chore. Here’s the description from the Take Control Web site. If you have any questions prior to purchasing, please feel free to email me.

Why take photos if you can’t find them later? Digital photography expert Jeff Carlson has developed a simple system you can use to make your photos browsable, searchable, and generally navigable!

Jeff leads off by helping you understand the strengths and weaknesses of the three most popular photo-management applications: Photos from Apple, and Lightroom and Photoshop Elements from Adobe. Once you’ve picked the app that’s right for you (and there’s a chapter on migrating to Lightroom from iPhoto, Aperture, or Photos), you’ll learn to create a custom workflow for importing, evaluating, keywording, and tagging your photos so they are quickly sorted. For each of these essential aspects of your workflow, Jeff provides step-by-step instructions for each of the three covered apps.

It’s all too easy to lose everything if you don’t have backups, so Jeff discusses how to back up and archive photos to protect your irreplaceable photographic memories.

Jeff also helps you pick an online service that can put your photos everywhere, looking particularly at the pros and cons, and how-tos, of iCloud Photo Library, Google Photos, Lightroom mobile, and Mylio.

I love this book. I’ve given talks about the subject to packed rooms at Macworld/iWorld and to user groups remotely—it’s great to help people bring order to the digital photo confusion and see them actually enjoy the photos they captured. Click here to order the book: Take Control of Your Photos on a Mac, Second Edition.

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.

Cc plan email

If you subscribe to Adobe’s Creative Cloud Photography Plan (which includes Lightroom CC and Photoshop CC, plus Creative Cloud syncing and Lightroom mobile for $10 a month), you probably received an email today containing a familiar name: me!

One of the highlights is a pointer (shown above) to the article that I published in Adobe Inspire in June, “Take Lightroom on Your Next Shoot.” If you missed the article when I pointed to it then, it’s all about how I used Lightroom mobile during a photo workshop in May through the California Redwoods.

I love writing articles like this, which point to practical things you can do with your photos in addition to inspiring you to get out and make more images. It was a fun one to write.

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.

Skyward, Redwoods

Knowing that I was away on a photo workshop in Northern California, an editor I’ve worked with for years contacted me with an interesting assignment: to write about how I use Adobe Lightroom in the field.

I’ve spent a lot of time (and three editions of my book The iPad for Photographers) thinking about how best to incorporate mobile technology into photography, and the field keeps moving forward. As a Lightroom CC user, I really like Lightroom mobile and how it syncs photos and adjustments from my iPad to my Mac and vice-versa.

The result is a new article, with a generous helping of photos from the Redwoods, posted today at Adobe Inspire: Take Lightroom on Your Next Shoot.

I outline a workflow for shooting, importing, and reviewing photos within Lightroom and the Creative Cloud ecosystem. One thing that surprised me: I found myself shooting more bracketed photos and side-by-side collections knowing that I could process those easily using the new Photo Merge HDR and Panorama tools in Lightroom CC.

One note, for those of you who have followed this field with me: I bypassed mentions of importing photos to the iPad while out shooting, which leads to special considerations for syncing and loading raw files later. (You can read more about that in my book.) What’s in the article is a streamlined, more sane approach to syncing and reviewing photos that won’t scare away novices.

Check out the article, and feel free to leave feedback here. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.

Clouds edit photos mac2

While I was away on my photo workshop, I put the last touches on an article that’s now at TidBITS, Photos Everywhere with Lightroom CC and Photos for OS X (which enabled me to include some photos on location, like the Yoda statue at Lucasfilm headquarters).

After writing the review of Lightroom CC for Macworld and an overview of what’s new in Lightroom for Lynda.com, I wanted to take a different approach to Adobe’s new software for TidBITS. In this article, I look at how Lightroom and Photos for OS X handle the issue of making photos available on Macs and mobile devices.

Apple’s approach puts your entire library on all devices using iCloud Photo Library, while Adobe turns to its own nimbus, Creative Cloud, to sync selected images between Lightroom and Lightroom mobile on iOS and Android phones and tablets. Read on to learn how the advantages and disadvantages of each approach at TidBITS.com.

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.

LightroomCC 01 top

It’s been a busy week! After reviewing Lightroom CC for Macworld, I turned around and wrote a general what’s new article for the great folks at Lynda.com: What’s New in Lightroom CC and Lightroom 6?

Right now I’m working on another related article for TidBITS while seated at my dining room table, listening for the rumble of the UPS truck that will bring my new Apple Watch. And drinking lots of coffee.

(I love my job.)

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.

LightroomCC 02 HDR module

Adobe released Lightroom CC today, and you can read my review of it at Macworld right now: Adobe Photoshop Lightroom CC 2015 review: New features and major performance gains. There are a few very cool features—like in-app HDR merging to create raw DNG files—but what I find most interesting is that Lightroom now takes advantage of the GPU (graphics processing unit) to speed up performance. The amount depends on your hardware, but let me just say that I now desperately wish I had an iMac with 5K Retina Display.

Lightroom CC is part of the $10 per month Creative Cloud Photography plan (the least expensive CC option), which also gets you the latest version of Photoshop CC (still 2014). However, if you don’t want to jump into the subscription model, Adobe is also making a standalone version called Lightroom 6 and selling it for $149.

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.