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360fly4k in hand

Following the publication of my guide to The Best 360 Degree Camera at The Wirecutter, I sat down with Chuck Joiner at MacVoices to talk all about it. We cover why someone would want a 360-degree camera in the first place, some background on how I went about making the final selections, and more.

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.

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The Wirecutter just published two enormous guides about photo accessories, which includes a couple of pieces I wrote for them. The guides cover a huge range of topics, from flashes to storage to camera straps and more.

It was great to work with the Wirecutter editors, a truly top-notch bunch of professionals who know their audience well. I contributed the Lens Filters (UV, ND, and circular polarizers) and Direct Backup for Photographers sections of The Best Camera Lens Filters, Flashes, and Accessories for Taking Great Photos piece.

You’ll also like the other piece, The Best Camera Bags, Straps, and Accessories to Carry With You, in which I’m quoted speaking favorably about the Peak Design Everyday Messenger.

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If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.

Aurora title beach

For years when I’ve been out photographing landscapes, I’ve dutifully shot bracketed exposures: three or more images that represent light, dark, and balanced views of a scene. The advantage of brackets is to combine them later into a single HDR (High Dynamic Range) photo that includes more detail than what a camera sensor by itself can capture.

Rivulets brackets

Making good HDR images, however, has traditionally been a dark art involving several steps and multiple applications, so most of those brackets in my library have remained untouched.

Now, I can’t wait to go back through and process them, thanks to Aurora HDR Professional, the new application by MacPhun and HDR expert Trey Ratcliff.

In fact, I was so inspired by this new professional tool that I wrote and published an entire book about it during the time between its announcement and release! It’s been a crazy, sleepless, caffeine-fueled two weeks, but I think you’re going to like the result.

AuroraHDR cover 400pxI’m excited to announce my new ebook Aurora HDR and Aurora HDR Professional: A Photoversity Guide!

This 53-page ebook starts with techniques for making high-quality original photos and then dives straight into using Aurora HDR and Aurora HDR Professional to turn those shots into HDR images. The full-color PDF covers the software’s comprehensive suite of image editing and HDR adjustment controls, using presets (and saving and sharing your own), and then moves into working with layers and masks for even more control over the final photo. Aurora HDR Professional works as a stand-alone application—no Photoshop needed—or, if you manage your photo library in Adobe Lightroom, also exists as a plug-in for round-trip editing. (For a great review of Aurora HDR Professional, see Mason Marsh’s entertaining writeup at Photofocus.)

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The book costs $12, but is on sale for $8 to celebrate the launch of Aurora HDR.

For more information, including sample pages and HDR example photos created during production, visit Photoversity.com.

Beach Rivulets HDR

This project also serves as a soft-launch of Photoversity, an entity for all sorts of photography-related projects. More to come later on that front…

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.